Assistant Editor short-term contract at the Journal of Experimental Botany

In June and July 2018 I will be working as Assistant Editor for the Journal of Experimental Botany based at Lancaster University’s Environment Centre. The Journal of Experimental Botany is a top journal in plant science owned by the Society of Experimental Biology and published by Oxford University Press. I will be guiding newly submitted papers on their journey though the peer-review process.

 

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Research linking rare aquatic plant distribution and palaeoecological data presented at IPA-IAL 2018 conference, Stockholm, Sweden.

Professor Helen Bennion presented some of our NERC Hydroscape research at the joint meeting of the International Paleolimnology Association and the International Association of Limnogeology, Stockholm, Sweden, June 18-21, 2018 (see site).

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Some of the research highlighted during this talk concerned the distribution of Elatine hydropiper (eight-stamen waterwort) in the Glasgow area. This aquatic plant is extremely inconspicuous and can grow at great depth underwater. Because of these characteristics it is believed to be very under-recorded by botanist and aquatic monitoring alike. It has also been hypothesised that it may be becoming more frequent, especially in Scotland. However our research demonstrates that in the Glasgow area, Elatine hydropiper was present in the 1850s at four lake sites out of eight investigated and became extirpated at two of these sites during the twentieth century. This shows that it was more widespread in the past and that more effort towards conserving suitable habitats for this aquatic plant should be undertaken.

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Underwater Elatine hydropiper lawn, with Elodea. This pictures shows how this rare aquatic plant thrives at the interface between water and soft sediments. Loch Bardowie, Glasgow, 2016.
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Elatine hydropiper on a clipboard. This pictures shows the green part of the plant to are located at the sediment surface and the green parts that grow buried in sediment.  Lochend Loch, Glasgow, 2017

New paper: Agricultural origins on the Anatolian plateau

Baird, D., Fairbairn, A., Jenkins, E., Martin, L, Middleton, C., Pearson, J., Asouti, E., Edwards, Y., Kabukcu, C., Mustafaoğlu, G., Nerissa Russell, N., Bar-Yosef, O., Jacobsen, G., Wu, X, Baker, A., Elliott, S. (2018) Agricultural origins on the Anatolian plateau. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Article first published online: 19 March 2018.

Research on biodiversity in the Upper Lough Erne area presented at the 15th International Symposium of Aquatic Plants, February 19th 2018, New Zealand.

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It was exciting to hear that our abstract was accepted for an oral presentation at this conference dedicated to aquatic plants. The research presented attempted to explain the decline in diversity of emergent aquatic plants in the Upper Lough Erne area, Northern Ireland, UK and related change to landscape connectivity. This presentation was supported by NERC through my two postdoc projects, Lake BESS and Hydroscape.

 

PR Statistics’ Structural Equation Modelling course, October 2017

Although only halfway through this one week course, I am already blown away! I signed up to open new opportunities for my datasets and this course on Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) is exceeding my expectations. And here again, like on field work, lots of jolly Hydroscape camaraderie with fellow Hydroscape researchers Geoff Phillips, Alan Law and mad tweeter Dr ZP @ZarahPattison

Designing stuctural equation modelling and sharing with others

This course, organised by PR Statistics and delivered by experts Jarret Byrnes and Jon Lefcheck, is taking us through all the basic of SEMs and is designed for us to become independent in implementing SEMs using our own data – or even better to collect data that will make the most of this analytical method.

SEMs allow us to account for the complexity of the natural world when analysing data collected in the field and get to grips with direct and indirect cause to effect relationship among variables.

It’s taking place in Wales, by the way.

Glasgow and Lake District field work 2017

Last site visited, Lake District. Photo by Alan Law

Two more weeks of relentless biological and environmental surveys, in the Glasgow area and in the Lake District! We again had a very ambitious schedule but managed to stick to it. We made a group picture at our last site, marking the official end of our work package’s field work. Great time with a fine team – I will miss it.

Over the two weeks I surveyed aquatic plant at over 40 sites, including a series of stretches of the Forth and Clyde Canal (F&C). F&C is a hotspot for aquatic plant rarities  – I recorded species such as Potamogeton trichoides, P. friesii, P. lucens, Lysimachia thyrsiflora in exceptional abundance within some of the stretches – let alone a collection of hybrid mints that made my botanical/herbarium press smell of heaven and specimens of of the charophyte Nitella mucronata, second, third and fourth sightings ever for Scotland.

North Norfolk field work 2017

Underwater world in North Norfolk

One week of field work in North Norfolk, surveying aquatic plants and collecting water samples for analysis in the lab. Working as a team with my colleagues from the University of Stirling, we completed all the planned work, which was a mammoth task and only possible thanks to amazing team work. Amongst other things, we completed 34 surveys of aquatic plants (totalling 580 macrophyte observations across North Norfolk) and revisited all of last year’s 28 sites.

Sorting samples well into the evening after a long day a field work.